The match-day programme notes for the game against
York on the 27th January 1912 proudly announce the signing of Lucius banks, a black American cavalryman
, who was spotted playing football by a Hunslet
committee man on business in New York. The club bought Banks out of the U.S.
Cavalry and paid for his voyage to England to play Northern Union
Football.

Lucius Banks introduced to the Hunslet followers in
the Parkside Echo for the game against York on January 27th
1912

Banks had a successful début in first eighty minutes of Northern Union
Rugby Football and scored a try thanks to a superb pass from the experienced
Billy Batten. The Parkside Echo issued for the next home against Wakefield
Trinity, in which Banks once again made an appearance on the wing, commented;
L Banks gave every satisfaction to our supporters in his first attempt to
play Northern Union football, and showed plainly that as soon as he gets
thoroughly conversant with the game, he will be strong in both attack and defence.’

The programme also commented It was amusing to see the bit of cheap sarcasm in
the Monday morning papers, but suppose they can’t help it

The Leeds newspapers had criticised the Hunslet club for signing what they described as ‘a coloured coon’ and commented that
the club should give more opportunity’s to local junior players and not sign
novelty players to a merely create publicity. It is interesting to note that
Hunslet thought the word ‘coon’ was merely sarcasm.
Banks played a handful of first team games at Parkside, Hunslet’s home ground, but spent most of his brief career in
the second team.

The match-day programme notes for the game
against York on the 27th January 1912 proudly announce the signing of
Lucius banks, a black American cavalryman , who was spotted playing football by a Hunslet committee man on business in New York. The club
bought Banks out of the U.S. Cavalry and paid for his voyage to England to play
Northern Union Football.

Banks had a successful début in first eighty minutes of Northern Union
Rugby Football and scored a try thanks to a superb pass from the experienced
Billy Batten. The Parkside Echo issued for the next home against Wakefield
Trinity, in which Banks once again made an appearance on the wing, commented;
L Banks gave every satisfaction to our supporters in his first attempt to
play Northern Union football, and showed plainly that as soon as he gets
thoroughly conversant with the game, he will be strong in both attack and defence.’

Eventually Lucius Banks’s great Hunslet adventure
simply ground to a halt.

Eventually Lucius Banks’s great Hunslet adventure
simply ground to a halt.

The harsh Yorkshire winter and the bleak industrial surroundings became
too much for the young American to cope with and he severed his connection with
Hunslet and sailed home. The Parkside Echo recorded
his departure with the following paragraph in the match day programme for the 26th December 1912